New Offerings

Latest courses add variety of academic options

BY MARI HERVER
Staff Writer

A new set of classes has been added to the Haas Hall Academy Fayetteville schedule. Founder and superintendent Dr. Martin W. Schoppmeyer Jr. wanted to expand the number of options available to scholars.

AP French and AP Micro/Macro Economics, taught by Jessica Clark and Rebecca Moll respectively, have been added as new Advanced Placement courses.

An engineering class for seventh-grade scholars and an Introduction to Engineering Design course for upperclassmen are taught by math and science teacher John Daily.

Mandarin is being offered for the first time this year at the Fayetteville campus. The class is taught by Grace Wang Hassman, parent of a Haas Hall eighth-grader. Hassman said Chinese is becoming more popular every day, so she thought it was important for her to volunteer to teach. Hassman previously taught an after-school Mandarin class for younger kids.

“The overall plan is to get them to start talking first and then introduce reading and writing later, because learning to speak Chinese is easier—a lot easier,” Hassman said.

Hassman writes the date on the board every day so scholars can get familiar with Chinese characters.

“It’s very challenging but definitely worth it,” senior Connor Fritsch said about the class.

Hassman is also teaching her scholars about Chinese culture.

“I believe that you have to understand the person’s culture and what is going on in their country in order to properly understand them,” Hassman said.

Girls’ basketball coach Mikey Moss is offering Sports Medicine, which is separated as two nine-week classes, in the spring. The first nine weeks focuses on legality, basic sports-related first aid and athletic injury care. The second nine-week course will cover other methods of treatment.

In a previous coaching job, Moss learned about sports medicine from a close friend working at the school.

“It kind of ups the ante of a traditional water boy. There’s more of a responsibility like hydration issues, concussion awareness, disease prevention and infection prevention,” Moss said.

Moss is hoping to generate interest in the field itself and potentially open an avenue for involvement in extracurricular activities.

“We might have a few kids that would be dedicated to making sure that certain aspects of preparation before sports events are taken care of, which would alleviate some pressure on the athletes and the coaches,” Moss said.

African-American History, taught by Tad Sours, is another addition to the set of courses this year. Sours had seen the class as a recommendation for the state and was interested in teaching the course.

“It’s a really fascinating, untold part of history,” Sours said.

The class focuses on dispelling myths of African societies and exposing the inhumanity that people of color had to suffer through.

In American National Government, taught by Rebecca Moll, scholars are able go to on field trips that connect them with their local government. The class is also focused on this year’s elections and will have a guest speaker from the extension office talk about ballot issues.

“It is a very project-based class,” said Moll.

Moll is also teaching a debate class in the fall that will be collaborate with the debate team sponsored by Jennifer Ombres.

This new assortment of classes at Haas Hall provides scholars with more opportunities to learn about their interests and broaden their perspectives this school year.

Photo by CAROLINE STELTE Haas Hall Fayetteville seniors Angela Saitta, left, and Hannah Hulbert use wires to make LEDs light up as they learn to build circuits in Introduction to Engineering Design.
Photo by CAROLINE STELTE
Haas Hall Fayetteville seniors Angela Saitta, left, and Hannah Hulbert use wires to make LEDs light up as they learn to build circuits in Introduction to Engineering Design.